nickdrake:

Sean Connery 007 James Bond.

    nickdrake:

    Sean Connery 007 James Bond.

    "The evil that is in the world always comes of ignorance, and good intentions may do as much harm as malevolence, if they lack understanding. On the whole men are more good than bad; that, however, isn’t the real point. But they are more or less ignorant, and it is this that we call vice or virtue; the most incorrigible vice being that of an ignorance which fancies it knows everything and therefore claims for itself the right to kill. There can be no true goodness, nor true love, without the utmost clear-sightedness."

    Excerpt from The Plague

    {Albert Camus}

    (via schusogo)
    "It is certain that we cannot escape anguish, for we are anguish."
    Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness  (via ceelebe)

    (Source: anamorphosis-and-isolate, via ceelebe)

    (Source: dennisriveraphoto, via ceelebe)

    ewok-gia:


Saturn’s hexagonal storm system in it’s north pole

    ewok-gia:

    Saturn’s hexagonal storm system in it’s north pole

    (Source: spaceexp, via paintgod)

    fuckyeah1990s:

    "Mystery Men" (1999)

    (Source: theonewithouteyebrows)

    rocketumbl:

    カトキハジメ  マクロスジャーナル 1984  Hajime Katoki

    (via seppukucorp)

    williamblakeandnobody:

    The Shining (1980)

    (via wonderland-inalice)

    "Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know."
    Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

    (via astrotastic)

    tedx:

    At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.

    To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»

    (Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)

    (via absurdcreation)